The Job Hunting Paradox

A tweet I came across argued that job hunters (a lot of us these days) needed to: (1) have a good story, (2) dazzle with your energy, and (3) know the company.

There's nothing wrong with that.
And everything wrong with that.

Pro-action is a (very) good thing. So I've argued for years. On the other hand, I believe that there is no force more powerful than effective listening. And the three (fine) factors enumerated above implicitly suggest that job hunters are always on the attack.

A good story is great.
BUT IT NEEDS TO BE THE RIGHT STORY FOR THE RECRUITER.

Dazzling with energy is fine.
BUT BEWARE THE FINE LINE BETWEEN VIGOR AND AIMLESS FRENZY.

Knowing the company is imperative.
BUT KNOWING THE COMPANY CAN DEGENERATE INTO A RECITATION OF STATISTICS ... RATHER THAN AN APPRECIATION OF THE COMPANY'S CULTURE.

I am hardly arguing for applicant-as-shrinking violet. But I am arguing that the attentive listener, listener between the lines in particular, has an advantage that is priceless. That is, job hunting is a paradox. One must exhibit equal adeptness at talking and listening—but maybe with a nod to the latter.

Remember that old one-liner about God giving us one mouth, but TWO ears. Atheist or devout believer, keep that in mind at all times!